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River Babingley

Despite centuries of modification, the upper Babingley remains one of the finest stretches of chalk river in Norfolk.  The river rises from springs all around the upper valley and has some of the cleanest, clearest water in Norfolk.  The river produces large numbers of trout, and is a haven for…

River Bure

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River Burn

The River Burn is a chalk stream which flows through a low-lying catchment and discharges into the salt marshes of Holkam National Nature Reserve. The River is classified by the Environment Agency as a Highly Modified Waterbody, a designation which recognises the long history of modifications to the Burn over…

River Gaywood

The Gaywood is a river of contrasts, rising in springs between Grimston and Gayton, travelling through rich farmland and allotments before disappearing under the centre of King’s Lynn and finally joining the Great Ouse.  It is one of Norfolk’s more accessible rivers, and also one the most densely populated catchments.…

River Glaven

The River Glaven flows 17 km through one of the most beautiful valleys in England. Rising from tiny headwaters in lower Bodham and Baconsthorpe the main river begins just below Selbrigg Pond where three streams combine at the outfall. Thereafter it descends wooded hills of glacial debris and passes through…

River Heacham

The River Heacham is a chalk stream which flows through an undulating landscape from its source to its outfall at North Beach in Heacham. A majority of the catchment overlies high permeability bedrock, making the aquifer productive, and accounting for a high proportion of the flow originating from the aquifer.…

River Hun

The Hun is a very short chalk stream (6 km) which carries its waters from its source in Hunstanton Park to its mouth in Holme Nature Reserve. Wildlife abounds in the surrounding area with a profusion of birdlife in particular. Nevertheless, the river habitat has been degraded by centuries of…

River Ingol

The Ingol is a chalk stream in North Norfolk which runs from its source in Sherneborne through a predominantly rural catchment until its mouth close to Snettisham RSPB Nature Reserve. Towards the headwaters of the stream agriculture is represented by low intensity grazing by cattle and captive red deer, with…

River Mun

The Mundesley Beck is a small river in north-east Norfolk, with a length of about 8 km. It has its headwaters at Northrepps, at circa 40 m (131 ft) OD, It flows in an east south-easterly direction parallel to the coastline before turning abruptly north-eastwards to discharge its waters into…

River Nar

The River Nar (west Norfolk) has, in recent years, been subject to extensive and intensive investigation relating to its management, nature conservation and fishery interest as well as determining how landowners and the general public treat and regard the river.  The investigations, subsequent consultations and attempts to implement rehabilitation measures,…

River Stiffkey

The River Stiffkey, in North Norfolk, rises from springs throughout the catchment and meets the sea at Blakeney Harbour, close to the village of Stiffkey. The main river originates in Guybon’s Wood, close to Swanton Novers and is joined by a number of tributaries, notably the Binham and Hindringham streams…

River Waveney

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River Wensum

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River Wissey

The upper Wissey – and connected tributaries – is a small chalk stream flowing largely through agricultural and military land. Rising to the east of the village of Bradenham, the river flows for 22 miles through the villages of North and South Pickenham, Great Cressingham, Bodney, Ickburgh before reaching Northwold.…

River Yare

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Weybourne Beck

Spring Beck in Weybourne (aka Weybourne Beck) is a little-known example of one of Britain’s valuable chalk stream habitats. It originates from springs in Hundred Acre Wood (near Weybourne Railway Station) before flowing through agricultural land, into the village of Weybourne and out to sea via a piped outfall at…